Skip to main content

About your Search

20121224
20130101
SHOW
Book TV 24
Today 8
( more )
STATION
CNNW 74
MSNBCW 55
CSPAN 48
CSPAN2 42
FBC 23
CNBC 18
KQED (PBS) 18
KPIX (CBS) 16
SFGTV2 15
KQEH (PBS) 13
KRCB (PBS) 13
KGO (ABC) 11
WMAR (ABC) 10
WBAL (NBC) 9
WRC (NBC) 9
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 494
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 494 (some duplicates have been removed)
presidential election in the united states. there were people people saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops off and michele bachmann drops off and left with a last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person. finally you get the last person standing. >> host: process of e elimination. >> which is consistent in whatever organization it is. i think it is in a sense is a simplified version of reality. i think you used a theory. theory start with simple and you make them more complex. if you take ge famous for the way it chooses lards. ge we always tell our students it's a company that works at practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things we say it should do. it's incredible profitable. if you have to pick them it's good at picking leaders. it's good at developing managers and picking the right people. ge spends twenty years selecting among the organization and slowly promoting them over and over and over again. and so the end of the day, twenty years, so you to work your way up. at the end of
because he's not worried about the general election. he's worried about a primary election like a rand paul. >> and the other -- >> by the way, he is from rand paul's state. it's possible. >> he is. the other thing to keep in mind is boehner's speakership vote is up on january 3rd. >> but you -- everybody keeps saying that, but to vote against the speaker who is the caucus nominee, let's face it, he is the nominee of the republican party. to not vote for the speaker is a major act of betrayal on the part of any member of the congress. you have to that day -- >> the idea if he goes and forces through a tax increase, they could express their dissatisfaction, their unhappiness, by not voting for him for speaker. it takes a majority of the full house for him to get elected. a couple dozen of those guys -- >> i know this stuff. >> for the sake of the viewers. >> but for the sake of me, there used to be a sense of doing the right thing, and by the time you're the party nominee for speaker, you vote for the party nominee for speaker. you don't just screw around with this thing because that wo
. do not vote for any incumbent, period. host: we are two years out from the next election. you say if this thing does not work, star of the campaign not to vote of the incumbents? caller: start it now. start the campaign now. they want to start campaigning earlier and earlier, we as the american people need to send a message now that if you cannot do it, if you cannot do your job, then we do not want you there. host: john in south carolina on the line for democrats. caller: the morning. listen very carefully. some of these people, they are all about money. ever since they are in office, some more against him. if i was the president and they do not do their job, i would come to the american people and say, listen, let's spend enough money to pay ourselves out of debt and start from scratch. all of those jobs will come back from china because the dollar will not be worth. that is what is it is a bout. host: on the front page of "the financial times." we also have a tweet. this is what the senate minority leader said yesterday on the floor after his meeting at the white house. [video
. it was days before the 1960 election and she thought i should see it. so she put me on top of a mailbox on this huge boulevard and i watched as this canyon filled in with people. and this very charismatic young man -- i was hooked. i did not know what he was saying. i did not understand what he was saying. how was not that precocious. and i knew it was very important. it was very exciting. now i know from google what he said and part of what he said was i am not running on a platform that says if you elect me things will be easy. being an american 6 in 1960 is very hazardous but with hope we will decide which path we take. i thought back at those words over the last four years because it was parallel to another young candidate. jesse barry had a very difficult life as she had hoped for the future. and i think about what she would have thought, knowing that that little boy shook on the mailbox would be working for the president and that president would be named barack obama. it is incredible. >> politics was a part of the conversation on a regular basis with your parents? >> yes. that wa
the government, the government suggested you can have our election with them are in the class, and they did a film, and it's absolutely priceless. i mean, the parents, they didn't have to do it because the teachers were not shy to do it. they would make this mistake or that little thing and they would have this comical elements but the students got interested. they got interested. they ended up collecting a monitor. i'm how good the monitor was. but it was all right. it was all right. and so there are ways i think, which are more likely to think of that i am. of taking these different ideas and say try to settle here or try it out over there. you are building the bar, and it's true that there are, none of these things, everything has its drawbacks. move along. >> final two questions. this gentleman right here, and back their. >> ninety. i've been involved in studying practicing chinese law for the last 45 years. i just want to say on a positive note you, justice breyer and also i think others talked and plenty differently which about changing a legal culture in china. and it wanted to menti
is going to require elected officials to do their jobs. the housing market is recovering, but that could be impacted if folks are seeing smaller paychecks. the unemployment rate is the lowest it's been since 2008. but already, you're seeing businesses and consumers starting to hold back, because of the dysfunction that they see in washington. >> the president's stern statement echoed the concerns of the american people, who are tired of washington gridlock. >> outside of washington, nobody understands how it is, that this seems to be a repeat pattern, over and over again. ordinary folks, they do their jobs. they meet deadlines. they sit down and they discuss things and then things happen. if there are disagreements, they sort through the disagreements. the notion that our elected leadership can't do the same thing is mind boggling to them. and needs to stop. so, i'm modestly optimistic that an agreement can be achieved. nobody's going to get 100% of what they want. but let's make sure that middle class families and the american economy and, in fact, the world economy, aren't adversely im
for us. but it all started about two days before election day. i had this realization that this was a possibility. this could actually happen. i went to the door of rabin's office and said, what if all of these major offices were held by women? this would be historic. we should do any event if it happens. so, as my friends now, my family, i am a self-proclaimed news and political junkie. on election night and had the tv, my laptop, and my i found, i was watching as the results came in. and it was happening. it happened. so yes, there were phone calls, there were e-mails, logistics', food selection, printing, tables, chairs, all the logistics. how this event king together is a question -- what if? what if we could get them. and i am so happy that we have. i am sure all of them will agree that type of vision is what put all of these five women where they are today. that question -- what if? today's event is bigger. it is bigger than political parties, bigger than politics. bigger than the chamber of commerce. today it is history in the making. it is not just a raised gla
gave as you preview of what is to come in march. >> after the election i will have more flex ability. >> yikes. more flexibility? my goodness this president has exercised more flexibility than a yoga master so far in his first four years. i can't wait to imagine what even more flexibility might look like. i mean, we have twisted the constitution a hundred different ways. we have had executive orders in assisted of legislation. we somehow believe that we will have a strong economy if we continue to punish people who produce and somehow reward people who don't. and we have also had a foreign policy that is supposed to make a stronger and more respected, but it hasn't worked out either. let's just put it this way. if that is flexibility, we all better learn to be very flexible the next four years. earlier this month susan rice withdrew her name from consideration from post of secretary of state. that's after strong opposition to her potential nomination. republicans were critical of her after she went on five different sunday news shows. she gave this explanation for the terrorist attac
>> brown: seven weeks after election day, there are open seats in congress. we look at contests in three senate races. >> ifill: fred de sam lazaro profiles a priest who became a doctor to help haiti's poor and orphaned children. >> brown: and we close with a conversation with the editor of a new anthology of verse: 100 poems written over 100 years. >> it doesn't have poetry. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: gunfire tore at the nation's holiday mood again today, with the emotional wounds from a school massacre still fresh. there were more fatal shootings, inclu
? because end of february are these elections. >> yes. the elections are, of course, more the campaign heading into the elections with all these noises, especially the end ecb noises that we hear from italy. that's going to cause concern that if italy does need help, how likely are they going to be to get it? in the years from 1993 to 2007 italy brought down its debt to gdp ratio to almost 100% and half of that time berlusconi is prime minister. it's not like berlusconi has a record of fiscal spending. >> no. but i guess also the times were different. >> the times were different but the interest rate was slightly higher than it is now. but the primary surplus of the country ran over that period which was an acceptable 3% on average is already right now reached once again. so all the parameters are in the right place and the only thing the next government needs to do is actually nothing. if it does nothing, if it doesn't reverse the reforms -- >> what's interesting is what berlusconi is campaigning on is austerity. he's running on an ant anti-austerity pro eu package. while it's untenab
to overcome it in this election. i worry about the future. not every candidate will have the particular advantages barack obama that had in his ability to raise money. >> another question from this side? >> there seems to be a growing consensus or perception that, unlike past democratic president, president obama has not left a ideological format of what it means to be a democrat. there is -- there has been a fear that with the party going so big and republicans moving to the right, there could be a battle for the soul of the party in the next four or eight years. do you see a post-obama age -- a civil war-like occasion happening? >> we just pushed the post-obama age off by four years. [laughter] >> i know. even in the next four years? >> what this president stands for -- i talked earlier about the fight we had. i was reading a book some of you may have read that was excellent about clarence darrow. he talked about some of the fights in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. during the gilded age and the progressive era. so much of the dialogue -- there were differences, but the fundam
telling than just what one election result might suggest. >> well, i think it certainly does and it gives him a certain platform and credibility that perhaps he didn't have before. but watching as these fiscal cliff negotiations have gone through the holidays, it certainly is perhaps a little bit more of a bully pulpit for the president and for his position on taxes. but i think the biggest story of the year came at the end of the year in the past week or so which is the massacre at sandy hook elementary school in newtown and i think the presidency now might be shaped by those events and those are the stories that both barnicle and andrea have chose n as the top story. would you agree this could be a signature for the second term? >> i to do. i do agree with that. i think the events of a few days ago in newtown, connecticut, will help shape a good portion of the president's second and final term in office. i think it gives us a huge impe it tus to changes in this country that had had taken too long to take hold. i think the presidency itself, i think the man himself was shaped and altered
shortly after the november presidential election. this is an hour and half. >> one of the best things about sitting across from you is that, for all of us who have been part of the institute's staff, we are wondering what you been thinking, with this experience has been like for you over the last year-and-a-half, two years. so tonight, we get to hear for the first time your reaction to the campaign. >> thank you very much. i want to thank the in boyer for the support the university has given the institute politics, including making it possible for us to hire such extraordinary people like steve edwards and been restored and all of the other people -- and ben reeseberg and all the other people. [applause] you have been wondering what i have been doing and i have been wondering what you have been doing. [laughter] >> those who were disappointed by this outcome, the democrats elated by this outcome -- given the conventional wisdom around this campaign, the president's approval ratings that were barely above 50%, often dipping below it, the unemployment around 8%, gdp growth stock of arou
better way to have spent our first year together here than surviving the ups and downs of election 2012. as i look back, i hope we have been able to give you the kind of thoughtful, sober minded take on presidential elections that our sacred democratic process deserves. after all, choosing our nation's leader is serious business. let me tell you, keeping a straight face throughout the year of absolute absurdity in this political condition has not been easy. come on, rick santorum was a serious contender for the nomination. that happened. and newt gingrich won the south carolina primary. for us political geeks here, the fact that newt gingrich was the jesse jackson of 2012 is complete hilarity. you have to laugh to keep from crying at the biggest punch line of all. after two years of campaigning, a record $2 billion in election spending, the angst, anxiety, where did he end up? where we started. president barack obama in the white house and a house of representatives. we can't hold it in any longer. our very last show of the year is something of an experiment. our first ever annual look
. when newt was elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican today was in wilderness. jimmy carter occupied the white house and both the house and senate were safefully democrat hands. the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took control bows the white house and the senate. in the house, where gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman who had an office steps away from newt's. can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was off in a lonely place. the republicans hasn't held a majority there since 1956. there was not a soul alive that could imagine a republican majority again. oh. except for newt. [laughter] with no seniority, but a tireless work ethic, a vision, and a mind filled with idea, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back bench of congress and meth devised a -- once again. it was gingrich that devised the famous contract with america. the plan that gave republicans more than something to run against in the historic 1994 election. he gave them something t
said his cabinet is designed to overcome crisis. he was elected as prime minister, a post he held before between 2006 and 2007. he's the first politician in 64 years to return to the position after resigning. abe filled the cabinet with familiar faces and new ones. he appointed suga as chief cabinet secretary. that makes him the head government spokesperson. aso is his deputy. he will serve as finance minister and financial services minister. the new foreign minister is fumio kishida. he served in the previous cabinet. onodera is defense minister. he's well versed in dip ro mat tick and security issues. he chaired a lower house committee in okinawa and the northern territories. a newly created post for akira amari for the council on economic and fiscal policy which was cut by the previous government. we asked people in central tokyo what they expect from the abe administration. >> translator: i hope it will fix the economy and energize japan. >> translator: i want a new cabinet to use tax-free on the tsunami survivors. i really have a high expectation about this. >> translator: i
? >> well, sadly mitt romney not only because he lost the election, because he went out with the same kind of comment that got him in trouble in the first place talking about giving people obama winning over voters because he gave them gifts kind of hurt the party on his way out. >> clarence? >> you beat me to the tea party but the old saying goes populous movements are like bees they sting and then they die. i think the sting of the tea party is over. >> that's a good axiom. is it yours? >> i'll take it. >> is it in the glossary? >> i'll go look it up. >> okay. i like it. destined for political oblivion in 2013. vice president join. -- joe biden. even if he runs in 2016 for the presidency. >> named the head of the whole gun thing. >> i'm telling you -- this position. >> we'll have to wait. >> his political style is seen unfortunately for him as too aseckic for broad appeal. maybe you should talk to his wife about running for president. his wife is terrific. >> he may or may not run for president, john. but a lot of people love joe biden. he's an authentic voice and democrats in particular
is on right now. >> we can now definitively say that president barack obama will be re-elected, mitt romney will come up a loser in this race. >> jon: the billing media story of the year, the presidential election. that was how it ended. barack obama beating mitt romney and an end to a bitter season that started early with the g.o.p. primaries and events like this. >> we saw some of this black church in south carolina where a woman asked you why you referred a president obama as the food stamp president. it sounds as if you are suitcase to go belittle people. >> first of all, juan, the fact is that more people have been put on food stamps by barack obama than any president in american history. [ cheers and applause ] >> i know among the political kli correct and i'm supposed to you use facts that are uncomfortable. [ laughter ] >> so that was just part of a long and memorable primary season. juan, is that your highlight of the year. [ laughter ] >> my highlight? it is telling again for newt gingrich. he in a subsequent debate when we was asked about extramarital life and enough about these
the people who aren't willing to make a compromise. >> this is something we know that our elected leader haves to get done and don't have hope for getting something done is on gun control in this country, although the conversation still wages on. fresh in the news is the fact that four firefighters were basically used as target practice for this person in webster, new york. two were shot and killed on christmas eve in upstate new york. there's the suspect right there. william spangler spent time in prison for murdering his grandmother. he shouldn't be access to weapons at all. police say that he left a note behind saying he was doing what he liked to do best, killing. they think in the burned remains to find his sister. they have found human remains but they haven't said whether or not it is his spangler's sister or lot. lynn, the fact that we're talking about this, do we do it now through the prism of newtown? he had also a weapon, the ar-15 rifle, one of the weapons that spangler used. do we look at it through the prism of newtown? >> newtown, virginia tech, columbine, northern illinoi
's available to lead italy. he'll run for office in the upcoming election, but only for a party willing to push his agenda. >>> but he has competition in the form of sylvia berlusconi. he tells cnbc he feels a responsibility to run. >> feel the need to return to the political arena to prevent the country from being delivered into the hands of a leftist party. >> and the crowds are out, the stores are ringing up those sales, but u.s. shoppers may be running low on holiday spirit. and analysts say that they're spending less, as well. hi, everybody. welcome. merry christmas out there. thank you for joining us here on the show. what we're looking at today, we've got slightly quiet markets ahead of the u.s. open. what we're seeing, though, that all the markets are being called lower across the board stateside. the dow is being called a bit lower, nasdaq is being called a bit lower and the s&p 500 being called down by a bybit, as well. we saw markets coming off on friday stateside. pretty significant drops, as well, given that we now seem to be a clashing of heads between the republicans and the demo
is these lawmakers were elected to make tough decisions and they haven't been able to do it it yet. >> if i may say so, it's also childish. thank you. >>> the longest-serving member of congress from massachusetts is the first to announce he'll run for john kerry's senate seat. ed markey was just elected to his 19th term with 76% of the vote. kerry, as you know, is president obama's pick to succeed hillary clinton as secretary of state. if and when he's confirmed, that senate job will pass to a replacement chosen by the massachusetts governor. then to a win ere of a special election a few months later. a regular election will be held in 2014 when kerry's term would have ended. >>> should teachers be armed in the classroom? big question, lots of answers. about 200 educators in utah are mulling that over today after attending classes on firearm use and safety. the course of geared toward teachers. instructors are not trying to persuade teachers to carry guns in schools, but to provide the information and training they need in the wake of the newtown massacre. the classes have been going on for some ti
law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special counsel by janet reno. he later represented the united states as u.s. ambassador to the united nations and served as a special envoy to sudan. he has been a great friend to missouri, st. louis, and washington university. please join me in welcoming him now. [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. i owe our speaker an apology. when you hear the apology, you are going to conclude that i am a really terrible human being. i am the kind of person who takes advantage of a friend, especially a friend who is vulnerable. when he is vulnerable, i pounce. tonight's origin was a rehearsal dinner the night before t
in bipartisan legislation. >> the speaker's no. 1 goal is to get elected speaker on january 3. >> reporter: the two sides are at odds over tax cuts and spending. republicans say it's up to the democratically controlled senate and white house to reach an agreement. >> republicans aren't about to write a blank check for anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. >> reporter: members of the house were told to come back to washington sunday evening. they would have a little more than 24 hours to vote on a measure to avoid the fiscal cliff. danielle nottingham, cbs news, washington. >>> teetering on the fiscal cliff is given wall street a case of vertigo. the markets plummeted early, but the dow regained most of its 150-point lost. >>> a former bay area city councilman is about to learn first hand how washington works or doesn't. he's a newly elected congressman and heading into the capitol hill quagmire. juliette goodrich talked to stallwell about his plan to fix our fiscal ills. >> let's face it. you're the freshman walking in. >> reporter:
of such ideas. now, there's plenty of precedent here. when newt was first elected to office in 1978 in georgia, his party, like the republican party today, was in the wilderness. the jimmy carter occupied the white house, and both the house and senate were safely in democratic hands. but with the election of president reagan in 1980, republicans took both the house and the senate. but in the house, where newt gingrich went to work each day, he was badly outnumbered. now, i worked as a hill staffer for a congressman's office who was only steps away from newt, and i can assure you for representatives like newt, the minority was often a lonely place. the republicans had not held the majority there since 1954, and it was not a soul alive who could ever imagine a republican majority again. oh, except for newt. with no seniority but a tireless work ethic, a vision and a mind filled with ideas, it was newt gingrich who sat in the back benches of congress and methodically devise a strategy over several years to make the republican party a party of ideas once again. it was newt edifies the famous contr
opposed to any tax increase and senator mccobb nell is up for re-election in 2014 where tea party rebellion toppled his own protÉge and instead, send rand paul to the senate. i'll bring in nbc news capitol hill correspondent, kelly o'donnell. >>> waiting for action here today. >> reporter: it seems pretty quiet at the moment, steve. it's one of those things where you feel like something big is going to happen but as you walk through the corridors here, it seems pretty quiet at the moment. >> well, we have all sorts of conflicting reports out there about what the broad framework would be if there's going to be a deal. i guess the big stumble bling block is number one, what is the fresh hold be for the tax income? $250,000 which obama originally proposed? $400,000 which he supposedly offered in a revised offer a week ago? and then, of course, the status of the sequester. we have $1.2 trillion in cuts over ten years, half from defense and half from nondefense discretionary spending. is there any indication if there's a deal today what they're talking about in terms of those two issu
or six weeks after election he has still not, laura, put a inning single major item on the table. that is the problem. >> laura: you can respond to stephen. true that john boehner didn't help with the plan bfiasco. stephen is right, isn't he not about harry reid, the idea that he is leading is farcicle. >> they did pass legislation to ensure that taxes wouldn't go up on anybody making $250,000. the senate actually passed legislation. >> laura: there were no spending cuts in that, though. >> the budget control act had $1.5 trillion in spending cuts already approved. so say that the senate hasn't approved spending cuts in the last congress is not true. the problem is this and i feel bad for john boehner if you were obama you don't know who to negotiate with. even with john boehner were to come to obama with a deal, john boehner is being held host and by members of his own caucus who won't let him do that. boehner can work with democrats to get it passnd and throw some of his support with the democrats to get it passed but the problem for john boehner is he has an election coming up
at some of the most memorable presidential moments of this election year. >>> president obama and senate members will be here in washington tomorrow, but we'll be hearing crickets on the house floor. nbc news has learned the republican leadership has not given representatives the 48-hour notice to return to work, another sign of inaction on the fiscal cliff front. joining me now for our daily fix, mr. jonathan capehart, msnbc contributor and "washington post" editorial writer. jonathan, we're just six days away, no indication from house republicans that they are going to come back any time soon. the leadership has gone mum on that. we know there's not been communication between boehner and mcconnell, obama and boehner. are you amazed with this short amount of time to go there seems to be no sense of urgency on either side? >> am i amazed, given what we went through with the debt ceiling, no, i'm not amazed. i think there are forces here in this town that would like for us, sure people would like for there to be a deal, but going over the cliff on january 1st when there's this notion wher
security as well. i want republicans to realize that they were elected to do the will of the people. not just the three% or whatever. they all need to understand that we are all affected by their thinking -- the president won the election, right? host: thank you for the call. i want to take you through some of the effects, if we do go off the fiscal cliff, if congress takes no action. this is the chart from the new york times of what will happen immediately and in the next couple months. in terms of the immediate tax increases, the payroll tax rise of 62% from four 0.2% and workers first $113,000 of income. capital gains, qualified dividend's, and estate and gift taxes are subject to higher taxes. higher earners face new taxes under the health care law. within the next couple glock -- a couple of months, the bush era tax cuts that have been debated over -- the bush-era tax cuts on income expire december 31, workers will not fill the impact until the treasury releases new withholding instructions. alternative minimum tax -- the charred talks about spending cuts, immediate and in the
united system with a federal election commission that's completely out of control and with other agencies unable to do anything about it. a lot of money coming in in ways that intimidate political actors until the policy process in a very bad way and the way that will only enhance the quality. one example from north carolina riva group ventures who want to influence the state legislature on a bill prepared a bunch of model commercials that destroyed members of the legislature. when a gc comment had nothing to do a type of culture. it basically defined in this child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and show them the commercials and said if we don't get what we want millions of dollars could be spent on commercials just like this. they got what they wanted to give him money. the idea this is not correct team from anthony kennedy was on a different planet in a different universe than the real world of what we face. so there's all of that to do with the marketing model legislation written basically by a signature is biggest plugged right in. it's the gilded age brought up
. >> after a few words of advice at home the bay area's newly elected congressman is about to get a crash course in washington politics. how the young lawmaker thinks he can help what many consider a broken system. ======b r e a k >> on tap for the next 24 hours more rain and i guess some big waves, too right, liz? >> we have a high surf advisory in effect for tomorrow. in the meantime we've got cold temperatures, overcast skies, a live look over the pleasanton area. we have wet weather heading our way. we'll show you coming up. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, the fiscal cliff. the dow is _ _ this marks the longt losing >>> stocks once again heading lower for a fifth day on those concerns about the fiscal cliff. the dow is down 106 plus points marking the longest losing streak in three months. >>> former bay area city councilman is about to learn firsthand how washington works or doesn't work. he is newly elected congressman heading on to the capitol hill quagmire. cbs5 reporter juliette goodrich talked to elect eric st -- eric swelwell. >> it is avoidable. >> reporter: he said he's ready to bring som
more establishment name. my own newsletters forecast and strategies. seven robbery and was elected and it has been a great ride. i consider myself a survivor in many ways. i maintained my contacts and the cia because i think there are a good source for information. we're a global economy, and the cia does everything. they've done research on virtually everything. >> we invited you want book tv to talk about the making of modern economics, the lives and ideas of right thinkers. >> cannot in 2001. it took me about five years to sit down and actually right. probably a lifetime of learning. and then the second edition came out in 2009 right after the financial crisis. we felt it needed to be updated after that event because my final chapter is dr. smith goes to washington, the triumph of free-market economics. of course there was a little premature considering what happened since 2008. we had to revise that. >> how is this book organized? >> well, initially when i tried to do was create an alternative to robert popular book of world philosophers. i wish i had that title. it's the story
in the future, you can get elected to public office in america saying i'm going to cut that because we can't afford it. but it's a long way off, i suspect, really a long way off. scott, i'm terribly sorry, i'm out of time. got to get to the stock market opening in a couple of seconds. happy new year. >> and to you. stuart: thank you. the clock is ticking and no matter the outcome of the debacle, republicans will get at least some the blame. we'll cover that in detail and we'll have the opening belfour you next. >> there is one issue that dominates stock market trading, cold trading, oil trading, you name it, all kinds of trading, one issue and one issue only, that's the fiscal cliff. you can spend a lot of sound bite trading. anybody in any authorities says anything about the likelihood or otherwise of a fiscal cliff deal you will see the market react. it happened earlier this morning. there was a report that maybe these talks between mitch mcconnell and vice-president biden were making some progress. on that, up went the futures market to show a gain of 80 points for the dow. we're back
before the election riding around the country talking to people about how they feel. some people don't really like politics. they'd rather do without it. some people don't really like the economy even though you got to live in it. but everybody -- but what we feel and how we spend dictates how well this economy goes. consumer confidence is something that's been riding higher and higher. i'm going to ask our control room to put up a chart of consumer confidence going back about half of this year. it was going higher and higher and higher, and then right around october we started to see it soften a little bit and then go down lower and now people are starting to give up a little bit. you will have seen spending of the holiday season will come out a little weaker than expected. that's really what drives our economy. and that's what people are feeling. so, john, when people tell me how much more am i going to pay in taxes, that's important. there's no question. we don't have $2,500 or $3,500 extra in most households to give up. but that's less important than the fact that people are star
you're telling yourself out of this election?" >> whew, it was bananas watching that election. but i think probably the thing that comes out most forcefully after the election is how little people were expecting the voting, the sort of, the electoral body that made obama's victory possible. i mean, i think there was -- no one was talking about the sort of numbers that showed up for obama. no one was predicting the diversity of the vote. no one was predicting that sort of the republican strategy for securing a romney victory would come to grief so kind of spectacularly. i mean, i'm telling you. even the communities who came out to vote, i think, were shocked by their own numbers and by their own power. i mean, when you look at the cuban community in florida, a community that has historically voted super conservative and suddenly see an entirely new generation voting, and you see those numbers that they put up for obama. it was extraordinary. and i think that a lot of folks have very poor sense of what's happening in this country on the ground. i mean, they're kind of all the way up he
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 494 (some duplicates have been removed)